5 Reasons why you should swap the Alps for the Helderberg

55

[ad_1]

Close to Stellenbosch lies a secret destination not many know about.

A destination that brings justice to the Helderberg in more than one way.

Taaibosch, previously known as Cordoba, is located on the slopes of the Helderberg where vineyards have been nurtured with the utmost devotion and dedication for the past century or more.

Currently owned by the Oddo family, it is their sole purpose to continue building on the wine farm’s rich legacy and to safeguard its terroir, like the custodians before them have done.

!function(e,t,r){let n;if(e.getElementById(r))return;const a=e.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0];n=e.createElement(“script”),n.id=r,n.defer=!0,n.src=”https://playback.oovvuu.media/player/v1.js”,a.parentNode.insertBefore(n,a)}(document,0,”oovvuu-player-sdk”);

Here are five reasons why it’s worth swapping your holiday in the Alps for a peaceful ‘wine down’ on the slopes of the Helderberg:

History

The original owner of Taaibosch (then Cordoba) was Abraham de Villiers – one of three de Villiers brothers who arrived in South Africa as Huguenot refugees in 1689 and made a huge mark in South Africa’s wine industry.

The de Villiers brothers were granted land in the Drakenstein district and farmed together for many years, establishing various landholdings.

As the family grew, they soon owned half or more of the Stellenbosch district’s farms and they were known as one of the families whose wealth came from wine.

After being in the de Villiers family for more than 100 years, Cordoba was sold to Hercules Morkel Hendriksz in 1843.

The farm was in the market for about ten years before it was bought by the Oddo family of France.

The farm’s name was changed to Taaibosch in an ode to the olive green Taaibosch plant that grows on the Helderberg slopes.

Conservation

The Taaibosch team has been working hard at clearing all alien vegetation from the estate and to rehabilitate it with natural flora indigenous o the Cape.

The Taaibosch surface area footprint consists of 55% natural flora and 45% vineyard plantings and buildings.

The estate’s compost heap is rather impressive and their passion for conservation is evident wherever you set foot on the estate.

Taaibosch Terroir
Taaibosch Terroir. Image: Supplied

Organic, quality wine

According to cellar master, Schalk-Willem Joubert, minimal intervention is a vision they have embraced for the estate’s wines.

To achieve this, they have implemented the most rigorous organic principles to both their viticultural and oenological practices.

“To farm organically is a culture, a disciplined way of working and a lifestyle,” he says.

“By achieving this, we believe we are able to stay true to the integrity of our wines, thereby giving to our patrons wines that have been made in a natural and organic way.”

Marketing director, Mark Lester also says that farming organically is no joke, but that there are so many benefits in the long run.

It is the early steps of their wine making process that make Taaibosch’s wines so special, and they’re all about making a terroir reflective wine, which means their fermentation process also differs from the norm.

Taaibosch Garden Villa
Taaibosch Garden Villa. Image: Supplied

Location, location, location

With Taaibosch being located on the slopes of the Helderberg, it comes with some of the best views in the area.

There are spots on the estate where you can see False Bay and on a clear day, even as far as Robben Island.

Of course, the historic manor house also comes with its own list of romantic luxuries, including a large patio overlooking lawns for days.

The location also has a great influence on terroir, which is of utmost importance when it comes to making the perfect wine, which in Taaibosch’s case is a blend consisting of mostly Cabernet Franc.

Taaibosch is adjacent to its sister property, Pink Valley and in close proximity to numerous other wine farms, which allow for more than enough things to do in the surrounding areas when you choose to stay on the estate.

READ: Five things you probably didn’t know about Pink Valley

Taaibosch Farsight Villa
Taaibosch Farsight Villa. Image: Supplied

A touch of class

With Taaibosch being open only to the people who choose to stay there, it’s easy to have the Garden Villa, Farsight Villa or the manor house all to yourself.

All these accommodation options are also only available as private luxury units, and the service offering can be customised according to your requirements.

The manor house and the villas are all equipped with full kitchens, various lounge areas and reading nooks, their own private pools, Riedel wine glasses, Smeg utensils and original art.

Everything about it spells class and luxury.

The manor house can sleep ten people with five rooms and has recently been completely renovated. The two villas have both also been updated a bit with the two-bedroom Garden Villa offering the most beautiful Helderberg backdrops and the four-bedroom Farsight Villa boasting views that reach Cape Point.

When it comes to Taaibosch, a sense of exclusivity lingers in the air. That, and the notion of an experience of a lifetime.

!function(e,t,r){let n;if(e.getElementById(r))return;const a=e.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0];n=e.createElement(“script”),n.id=r,n.defer=!0,n.src=”https://playback.oovvuu.media/player/v1.js”,a.parentNode.insertBefore(n,a)}(document,0,”oovvuu-player-sdk”);

[ad_2]

Source link

Leave a comment